The MODX Revolution Manager Tour

Highlights of the MODX Revolution Manager are shown below. For a full hands-on review and to get a feel for the dynamic interaction, try out the demo.

  • Login Window - The "Manager" back end control panel application can be located anywhere by changing configuration settings.

  • The Dashboard - The starting point once logged in. Dashboards can be completely customized by site builders to include custom dashboard widgets, like the Google Analytics one shown here.

  • Resource Tree - "Resources" are a heirarchical, visual representation of your website. Usually web pages, Resources can be anything reached via URL, including RSS feeds, CSS or Javascript files, downloadable PDF/DOC/XLS fils, web service endpoints, blogs, catalogs or other types of custom Resources.

  • Edit Resource - Click on a Resource in the Resource Tree to work with a simple form. Textarea fields can have wordprocessor-like "rich text editing" tools, or source code highlighters, to make creating and editing content simple for both coders and normal people too.

  • Context Menu - This gives you the ability to quickly edit or create new content by right-clicking on items in the Tree menus.

  • Help - The help system inside MODX is directly linked to the documentation wiki so you can always have the latest, up to date information about MODX.

  • Quick Update - This is another convenience method to access managed content by right-clicking on an item and choosing Quick Update. Using Quick Update lets you make changes or reference items without leaving the current item on which you're working.

  • Package Management - Adding new functionality to MODX Revolution is simple, and can be done right from within the Manager itself. Whether you need a small bit of custom functionality, or a full-blown mini-application like a blog, you can quickly make your site your own.

  • Third-Party Components - Known as "3PCs", these are custom applications running inside the MODX Manager. Examples include forums, blogs, galleries, analytics, maintenance tasks, LMSes or anything else you can dream up that goes beyond basic content management.

  • Element Tree - Elements are the building blocks of a MODX website. They include Templates, Chunks, Snippets, Template Variables and Plugins (more info on the following screenshots).

  • Templates - Templates in MODX are any type of wrapper content a site builder chooses. Typically they are the HTML/CSS and Javascript that make up the static site mockup, but they can also be XML files, etc. MODX enables site builders to have 100% control over every byte of output. Equally as important, anyone can create a fully custom template in MODX without ever touching a single line of PHP code.

  • Chunks - Chunks are reusable bits of static content, like a footer used on every page of a website. Chunks are represented in Templates as (bracket-bracket-string).

  • Snippets - Snippets are where PHP code goes in MODX, like a dynamic menu builder or content formatter. Snippets are represented in Templates as . Separating Snippets from the content and Templates enables designers to work with developers to build sites more quickly.

  • Template Variables - Known as "TVs", these are custom content fields. Resources can have an unlimited number of TVs, and TVs can have a variety of input methods that go beyond typical lists, checkboxes and input fields like color choosers, Google maps, auto-tagging selectors, and more. Template Variables are placed in Templates using .

  • Plugins - Plugins can work on the front-end of a website, or on the back-end Manager application, to change how MODX works. Examples include adding Rich Text Editors (RTEs) on Manager content fields or adding Google Analytics calls to every page on the front end. Plugins do not have a tag syntax for use with Templates or Resources—they only work system-wide on events in the MODX Revolution parser and Manager.

  • File Tree - Manage via drag and drop, upload and preview images directly in the tree, or use a graphical browser to work with files on the filesystem, or anywhere else, thanks to Media Sources.

  • Media Sources - Unique to MODX, Media Sources allows developers to create custom "drivers" to access files located or stored anywhere, and to use them with File or Image TV-types, or with the File Tree. Examples include, Amazon S3 buckets, a SharePoint repository, or an encrypted local filesystem.

  • Search - For larger sites, search enables content editors to find what they need fast, and only shows them the results that they have permissions to access.

  • Contexts - Contexts allow a site builder to build, and site owners to manage, all the subsites, microsites, landing pages, blogs, departmental sites or other sites under a single login. Contexts can also provide for alternate, custom Manager interfaces.

  • Content Types - These allow you to control how Resoureces in the Resource Tree behave, including disposition (inline or downloadable), content type and the extension (html, rss, xml, etc.).

  • Actions - Along with custom Dashboards when logging in, Actions give developers and site builders the ability to fully customize the menus of the Manager. Think of it as getting a fully bespoke content management platform, right of the shelf after a tiny bit of configuration.

  • System Info - In the event that troubleshooting is called for, this provides sysadmins, dev ops and developers important information they need about the server environment on which MODX is running.

  • Manager Log - This provides an audit trail of activity by the Manager users so you know who does what inside MODX.

  • ACLs - Incredibly robust and capable, the ACL system in MODX Revolution goes beyond typical user/group/roles by adding an additional layer of Attributes. Every action and object in MODX can have an associated ACL for fine-grained control.